Me on TV, Miasma, and Chaos

David Meyer in Montana

David Meyer in Montana

David Meyer on Television

Some big news for me lately. As reported on my Facebook Page …

Just got back from Montana where I was filming my first major television appearance. I can’t say much at the moment, but I had a great time. Expect it to premiere sometime in the next 6 to 9 months … stay tuned!

Miasma Update

In other news, I finally moved Miasma past the 1/3 point today. It’s been slow out of the gate, as I’ve spent way too much time revising early drafts. My first drafts are very messy and full of inconsistencies. Characters are flat. Some vanish for no reason. Others die only to be resurrected. Subplots get dropped. Story points don’t connect. Locations change, sometimes in the middle of chapters. Some scenes go on and on. Others move way too fast. And so on.

In the past, I’d write 50 pages, become frustrated with the problems, and revert to endless rewrites. And that would work … to a degree. The section would markedly improve. But when I’d try to move the story forward, I’d hit more walls as I attempted to connect the new, messy material with the older, polished stuff. I’d then go back and start over again, often writing the first section over and over again, in several different ways, as I tried to figure out how to make everything fit together.

I’ve come to realize my creativity comes in waves. The first draft is going to be messy no matter what I do. But at the same time, it contains a layer of creativity. Further drafts add more creativity. Characters get combined and fleshed out. Story points get connected. Scenes settle into place. Moving forward, I’m going to take advantage of this. My plan is to finish the first draft of Miasma, warts and all. Only then will I begin the creative rewrites.

Chaos Update

I published Chaos way back in October 2011. I read it the other day and found myself dissatisfied with the writing style. I still like the story. But it’s a bit bloated. So, I’m thinking about publishing a second edition. I’m not even halfway through my first take and I’ve already cut over 10,000 words. Anyway I hope to get this done within the next month or so. And don’t worry … if you’ve already bought Chaos you should be able to update it to the second edition with no problem.

Word Count

Miasma: 22,076 words / ~80,000 words

Chaos (Second Edition): 32,045 words / 83,135 words (Words Cut = 10,102)

First Draft of Cy Reed #3 is Done!

I finished the first draft of Cy Reed #3 earlier today. It’s tentatively titled Lost Canyon and clocks in at 404 pages. No idea on the publication date yet but I’m shooting for January 2014. I’d love to have it out sooner, but this book is going to require a little editing magic.

Today also marks the three-month anniversary of Ice Storm‘s publication. It wasn’t easy to get it out the door. On one hand, I was thrilled to put it behind me. On the other hand, it’s always hard to let a book out into the real world. I don’t have kids, but I imagine the feeling is  similar.

Anyway I didn’t have much clue how Ice Storm would do once it hit the market. Chaos sold reasonably well for a first novel but it certainly wasn’t a best-seller. Well, these past three months have been a wild run to say the least. I’m humbled to report Ice Storm has sold far better than even my wildest expectations.

I had my first real “sales breakout” on August 3 in the UK when Ice Storm cracked the Action & Adventure Kindle list at #84. I’m not sure where it peaked but it did get to #18 at one point and #483 in the overall UK Kindle store.

Ice Storm’s experience in the U.S. market has followed a different, but also exciting path. Since publication, it’s risen steadily in the overall Kindle rankings. It reached #7,864 a few days ago and has since settled back down to 11,478. I’m not sure if it’ll keep rising or not, but it’s been fun to urge it on.

The Future of Guerrilla Explorer?

Change is a good thing…I think.

David Meyer

Here I am!

Back in 2011, I was hard at work on a novel, which I eventually published as Chaos. I’d already decided to self-publish it. But I had no clue how to sell it. So, I followed the path taken by many other authors. I started a blog on May 21, 2011 called “The Life of a Thriller Author.” I updated it regularly, writing about the business of writing. I created a Twitter account and reached out to authors. I started following blogs written by those same authors. In short, I immersed myself completely within the community of on-line authors.

And that was a problem. I came to believe that authors, by and large, were too insular. They were so busy talking to each other that they didn’t have much time left over for their readers. So, on June 28, 2011, I shut down “The Life of a Thriller Author.” The next day, I launched Guerrilla Explorer. For almost two years, I’ve written articles on mysteries of history, lost treasure, and strange monsters. It’s been an amazing experience and I’ve enjoyed every second of it. However, I’ve begun to question it as well. Guerrilla Explorer requires a lot of time and research. It often distracts me from my real goal, which is to write fiction. Plus, I’m not sure it’s doing a good job connecting readers to my fiction.

So, I want to try an experiment. I want to write about writing again. But this time, I don’t want to write about the business end of it. I want to write about creation. I love talking about creativity. It’s one of my greatest passions.

For the next few days, I’m going to give you a front-row seat to the development of my upcoming book as well as future projects (I work on three or four books at a time). I want to talk about my inspirations. I want to show you my character sketches. I want to unveil my storyboards. And since fiction is always influenced by life, I want to open up that door to you as well. That’s no simple task. As my closest friends can attest too, I’m notoriously close-lipped.

I don’t want to give away major plot points. But I would like to give you an inside look at how I create stories. If it goes well, I’ll expand the experiment. If not, I’ll switch back to the usual stuff you’ve come to expect from me. But ultimately, I’d love to use this site to give you greater access to the worlds I create. In the future, that could involve short stories, contests, comics strips, video games, etc.

So, stick with me and let’s see where this goes. Change is a good thing…

I think.

Chaos by David Meyer

Happy Guerrilla Explorer Day!

Happy Guerrilla Explorer Day! It’s hard for us to believe it, but Guerrilla Explorer has now been in operation for a full year. We thought we’d take a break from our normal routine to tell all of you a little about where we’ve been and where we’re going. So, let’s get started!

Chaos by David Meyer

Guerrilla Explorer – Year in Review

Guerrilla Explorer launched on June 29, 2011 with our first two articles, A Manifesto and The Hunt for Bin Laden’s Corpse. Over the last twelve months, we’ve published over 360 articles on a wide variety of subjects, most recently on the Baltic Anomaly late last night. Our monthly traffic has grown ~1,600% and our average daily traffic is now in excess of our entire traffic for the month of July 2011. In addition, we fulfilled our goal of annual traffic in the six figures by a wide margin.

On the publishing front, we released our first novel, Chaos, on October 17, 2011. Although it’s been out less than a year, we have it on good authority that across all channels, Chaos ranks in the top 2% of all books sold, including both self-published and traditionally-published books. We’re quite proud of that success. Hopefully, the upcoming sequel will do even better. If you haven’t picked up your own copy of Chaos yet, we encourage you to do so and tell us what you think.

What’s Next for Guerrilla Explorer?

Going forward, you can expect the same high-quality articles on the topics we’re so fond of here at Guerrilla Explorer. There aren’t a lot of on-line magazines devoted to things like mysteries of history, lost treasures, monsters, and strange anomalies. So, we think we’ve carved out a unique niche for ourselves. With that being said, it’s become apparent to us that some changes are necessary. Here’s a few of them in no particular order…

  1. A New Format: For most of this year, we published Guerrilla Explorer as an ordinary blog. Recently, we’ve begun experimenting with magazine-style looks to better display our content. Our current format is a step-up, but we’ve got a ways to go. So, expect at least one more change in the near future.
  2. A New Home: It’s become apparent to us we’ve outgrown our little home on Blogger. Blogger is an excellent, easy-to-use service. However, it doesn’t really offer the same type of freedom and personalization found on WordPress. We’re not exactly eager to transform our library of content, but we think the upside outweighs the downside. There will probably be some hiccups along the way, so please bear with us.
  3. A New Community: While our content and repeat traffic has grown substantially, we have yet to fulfill one of our key goals…establishing a true community for all you Guerrilla Explorers out there. So, we plan on making some tweaks this year, which will hopefully change all that.

Those are just a few things we hope to improve here. Of course, none of it will happen right away but we hope to have made major strides by this time next year.

As far as our book publishing segment is concerned, a sequel (not a direct sequel though) to Chaos is underway. The first draft was completed several weeks ago and the second draft is about 30% done. This book is actually the first of a three-part miniseries, starring archaeologist-turned-treasure hunter Cy Reed. It’s similar to a serial novel, but each installment will be long (300 to 400 pages) and self-contained (i.e. they will have their own beginnings and endings).

We’re also considering publishing some of our non-fiction content here on Guerrilla Explorer in book form. If there’s any interest in this, let us know!

Guerrilla Explorer’s Analysis

Well, that’s all for now. Thanks to all of you for your support thus far. If you wish to contribute to Guerrilla Explorer, our doors are open for individual guest posts and articles on the various subjects we cover. Just drop us a line.

Thanks again!

The Book of the Dead?

The Book of the Dead refers to a type of ancient Egyptian funerary text, first used around 1550 BC. Its purpose was to help the dead navigate the dangerous path to the afterlife. For many years, historians have searched the globe for pages from the most famous Book of the Dead. It belonged to Amenhotep, the Chief Builder of the Temple of Amun. However, those efforts have been thwarted…until now.

The Book of the Dead?

Recently, Dr. John Taylor of the British Museum discovered the missing papyrus pages in Queensland Museum. Here’s more from The Daily Mail:

The last missing pages from a supposedly ‘magical’ Book of the Dead from an Egyptian priest, Amenhotep, have been found after a century-long search – in a museum in Queensland.

British Museum Egyptologist Dr John Taylor said he was ‘floored’ by the discovery of the 100 fragments.

It’s the end of a worldwide search by archaeologists for the papyrus scroll – which supposedly contains spells to guide spirits into the afterlife.

Ms Bates said British Museum Curator and world renowned Egyptologist Dr John Taylor had stumbled across a section of the manuscript as part of a Queensland Museum display.

‘After spotting the piece Dr Taylor was shown the other 100 plus fragments held in the Museum’s stores and was floored by what he had uncovered,’ Ms Bates said.

‘These unsuspecting papyrus pieces form the missing part of a highly historically valuable ‘Book of the Dead’ that belonged to the Chief Builder of the temple of Amun, Amenhotep.

‘Sections of this precious manuscript have laid scattered across the globe for a hundred years with some of the pieces held safely in the collections of British Museum, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art (MET), New York…

(See The Daily Mail for the rest)

Chaos Book Cover

Six Months of Chaos!

Exactly six months ago, I published Chaos, an action/adventure novel along the lines of Indiana Jones or books written by Clive Cussler, James Rollins, Douglas Preston, or Steve Berry. It deals with all the things we love here at Guerrilla Explorer…forgotten history…stolen treasure…strange science…and the “lost world” of tunnels under New York City. So far, I’ve been thrilled with the reception, both in terms of customer feedback as well as the nothing short of phenomenal sales Chaos has enjoyed across the globe. For those of you who’ve been asking, a sequel is coming soon…very soon!

Chaos by David Meyer

Megalith’s Review of Chaos

With that in mind, I just wanted to thank Megalith for their recent excellent review of Chaos. Megalith is the go-to site for action / adventure novels so this particular review means quite a bit to me. Here’s a taste…

Chaos is the debut action-adventure novel from author David Meyer. The story follows the exploits of Cyclone “Cy” Reed, an archaeologist running from his past. Reed is hired to solve a mystery but he gets much more than he bargained for.

Chaos has all the elements of a top-notch adventure story. Cy is an engaging hero who finds his way in and out of lots of perilous situations. Meyer paints an interesting back-story of lost Nazi gold and Die Glocke, a doomsday weapon sought by a powerful villain. By setting the action in tunnels beneath Manhattan, Meyer has chosen a locale that might not be the norm for action-adventure, but is remote and “wild” in its own way, and he populates it not only with human threats, but dangerous creatures as well. The plot moves at a steady pace and gains momentum leading to an action-packed conclusion. Also, the book is written in first person, which I don’t normally read, but I found I enjoyed…

Please read the rest here. And thanks Megalith! For those of you who haven’t had a chance to read it yet, please consider picking up your copy of Chaostoday at one of the following locations:

Kindle * Nook * Kobo * iBooks * Smashwords * Paperback

The Black Swan Heist?

On May 18, 2007, Odyssey Marine Exploration flew 17 tons of salvaged gold and silver coins to a secure facility in Florida. Now, five years later, U.S. courts have forced Odyssey to hand over this treasure to the Spanish government. What is the Black Swan Heist?

Odyssey & the Mysterious Black Swan Project?

Odyssey is a publicly-held marine salvage company. In other words, it’s a treasure hunting firm. Back in 2007, Odyssey completed a top-secret salvage expedition known as the Black Swan Project, uncovering some 17 tons of coins and other artifacts in the process. The operation is believed to have cost two million dollars and taken numerous years to complete.

Almost immediately, the Spanish government filed a claim on the treasure, arguing that the Black Swan was actually a Spanish vessel known as the Nuestra Señora de las Mercedes, which sank in 1804. Five years of court battles and drama followed. At one point, WikiLeaks even got involved. A secret cable revealed the American ambassador to Spain offered to help the Spanish government recover the treasure from Odyssey. In exchange, Spain was asked to compel a museum in Madrid to return a $20 million painting to a California family that claimed it had been stolen by the Nazis.

The Black Swan Heist?

In September 2011, the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against Odyssey in a highly questionable decision. In February 2012, Justice Clarence Thomas, acting on behalf of the U.S. Supreme Court, declined to hear the case. As a result, Odyssey is being forced to hand over the Black Swan treasure to the nearly-broke Spanish government. And in a slap to the face, the firm won’t receive any compensation for its work (leading many treasure hunters to suggest Odyssey return the Black Swan treasure to the ocean and make the Spanish government pay for its own recovery).

I don’t want to get into the minutia of the case here. The international laws governing shipwreck salvaging are murky and highly tilted toward governments over individuals. Suffice it to say the Black Swan wreck was never conclusively proven to be the Mercedes. And even if it was the Mercedes, that means that the vast majority of the coins were owned by merchants and not the Spanish government. Spain claims it had reimbursed the merchants back in the early 1800s and thus, was entitled to the treasure (interestingly enough, it has yet to provide any proof of this compensation).

Guerrilla Explorer’s Analysis

From my point of view, this is a short-sighted decision that will have long-term ramifications (something I discuss in my novel Chaos). Going forward, treasure hunters will have little to no incentive to report their findings to the world. The black market for antiquities will grow. The treasure hunting field will attract a greater number of reckless and unskilled individuals. Thus, salvage work will be done with more haste and less care.

As I see it, the Black Swan treasure falls under the homesteading principle. There are three possible owners of the Black Swan wreck. The dead (or their descendants), the “community” (supposedly represented by the Spanish government), or Odyssey. First, the dead merchants can no longer claim ownership. In addition, the merchants basically stole the metal for the coins from the Incas making it extremely unlikely the original owners can ever be traced (although some Peruvians are making their own claim). Second, the Spanish Culture Ministry has no legitimate claim to the treasure. Governments cannot legitimately own private property, since everything they have (including tax dollars) has been, in effect, taken at the point of a gun.

Overall, I would argue no one owned the Black Swan wreck prior to discovery. Odyssey, on the other hand, is the rightful owner of its own labor. By salvaging the Black Swan, the company added its labor to the treasure and thus, became its rightful owner.

I’m a treasure hunter. Yet I also consider myself an amateur archaeologist. As such, I’m very sympathetic to the concept of “historical preservation.” However, I don’t think that “stealing” artifacts from the treasure hunters who recover them is the best way to achieve that goal. Instead, I tend to favor the idea of privatizing archaeology.

“In other words, if “archaeological entrepreneurs” were able to sell their wares freely, they would have greater incentive to do better work in order to fulfill the demands of their customers (i.e. museums). Also, in the absence of antiquities laws, private owners would be more likely to share their artifacts with researchers, especially since subsequent research might increase the value of the artifact in question.” – David Meyer, Is Treasure Hunting Immoral

I realize I’m in the minority on this issue. But that doesn’t mean I’m wrong. Freedom has vastly improved the lot of mankind over time. I believe it could do the same thing for the field of archaeology.

The Finest Goldsmiths of the Ancient Americas?

Around 300 AD, a mysterious civilization in Colombia began to sculpt an incredible array of items out of gold. Eventually, these people would become known as the finest goldsmiths of the ancient Americas. Who were the Tairona?

The Chaos Book Club

So, today we have a Chaos book club bonus for you. Chaos is an adventure thriller along the lines of Indiana Jones or books written by Clive Cussler, James Rollins, Douglas Preston, or Steve Berry. If you haven’t already done so, please consider picking up a copy at one of the following locations:

Kindle * Nook * Kobo * iBooks * Smashwords * Paperback

Who were the Tairona?

The Tairona were a group of chiefdoms who resided in parts of Colombia from 200 AD until 1600-1650 AD. During this period, they “established over 250 masonry settlements across an area of 2,000 square miles.” This includes the famous Ciudad Perdida, or “Lost City.” Ciudad Perdida was unknown to the outside world until it was discovered by treasure hunters in 1972. When artifacts from this site began to appear on the black market, local authorities investigated and found the city in 1975.

Unfortunately, information about the Tairona people is scarce, limited to some archaeological sites and a few references written by their Spanish conquerors. However, we do know that “they aggressively repelled the Spanish when they attempted to take women and children as slaves in the first contacts.” This led to great losses among the Spanish and ultimately, “a more diplomatic strategy” for disarming and taking control of the locals.

The Tairona people were, in my estimation, the finest gold workers of the pre-Columbian Americas. Their caciques (an example is pictured above) are particularly impressive. These gold cast pendants depict people in richly detailed attire and headdresses. While the subjects are unknown today, they are thought to be chiefs or warriors due to their tough facial expressions and aggressive postures.

Chaos by David Meyer

Chaos, Gold, & the Tairona?

One of the opening scenes in Chaos takes place at a recently discovered Tairona archaeological site on an isolated plateau in the middle of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. My hero Cy Reed is there to retrieve a cacique. Unfortunately for him, others in the area will do anything to stop him.

At the bottom of the hill, I glanced over my shoulder. Every single worker, male and female alike, raced after me. It was a strange, disconcerting sight, like being chased by an army of angry lemmings.

I sprinted uphill and grabbed my climbing equipment. As I slipped into the harness and secured my weapons, I snuck another look behind me. The workers were right on my tail. I didn’t have much time.

I didn’t have any time.

I stuffed the cacique into my satchel and ran forward to where my climbing rope was still anchored to the boulders below. With a savage cry, I leapt off the cliff. As my feet left the ground, a single thought raced through my mind.

What the hell am I doing?

The hunt for the cacique plays only a minor role in Chaos. But it’s important nevertheless. First, it connects Cy Reed to the mysterious Beverly Ginger, who has her own plans for the cacique. And second, it marks the first domino in a series of incidents that drives treasure hunter Cy Reed back to the one place on earth he truly fears…New York City.

 

Chaos Book Club

 

Chaos Book Cover

What’s Next for Cy Reed?

On October 17, 2011, Chaos was officially unleashed upon the world. Readers across the globe thrilled to the heroic exploits of former urban archaeologist turned treasure hunter Cy Reed (well, at least I hope they did!). So, what’s next for the newest hero in adventure/thriller fiction?

Chaos by David Meyer

The Chaos Book Club

Today is Day 21 and thus, the last day of the Chaos book club. Chaos is an adventure thriller along the lines of Indiana Jones or books written by Clive Cussler, James Rollins, Douglas Preston, or Steve Berry. Thanks to those of you who’ve bought the novel already. If you haven’t already done so, please consider picking up a copy at one of the following locations:

Kindle * Nook * Kobo * iBooks * Smashwords * Paperback

Some Thoughts on Chaos

We’ve come to the end of book club and so I thought I’d give you a few brief thoughts on what’s coming next for Cy Reed. I wrote Chaos to be a modern, urban spin on the traditional adventure story. Rather than scale mountains, Reed scales a skyscraper (well okay, he actually does both). Rather that fighting through a vicious natural river, he’s forced to confront a violent artificial body of water. And rather than fighting a typical “secret society” in order to recover an ancient relic, Reed battles a gang of old subway workers, or sandhogs, who are protecting a decidedly not-so-ancient secret. Even Reed himself is a modern, urban version of the archetypal archaeologist hero. He’s a former urban archaeologist who once worked extensively in New York City.

Besides wanting a challenge, I had a good reason for writing Chaos in this manner. In an age of satellite technology, globalization, and the Internet, the world often seems lacking in mystery and adventure. Want to view ancient ruins? Look for photos on the Internet. Want to visit a remote island? Book your flight and accommodations at affordable prices. None of this is a bad thing. We’re fortune to live in a world where questions can be answered and desires to see things can be quenched. And of course, there’s always the vast reaches of the universe. Still, I can’t help but wonder what it was like in an earlier era when so much of the world around us seemed scary and unknown.

Thus, I set Chaos in the least mysterious place I could imagine…New York City. And then I set about to create a world of adventure and wonder in that place. I hope I succeeded.

What’s after Chaos?

But with that story behind me, I want a new challenge, both for myself as well as for Cy Reed. In the not-so-distant future, I’ll be taking an extended expedition to Mexico, Guatemala, and Belize. In other words, the world of the ancient Mayans. I’ll be staying with locals, exploring ancient ruins, and immersing myself in the culture of the Yucatán Peninsula. That will be the setting for the sequel. The novel will also address a theme which I briefly touched on in Chaos…namely, the existence of complex, possibly chaotic systems and mankind’s dangerous attempts to wrangle control over those systems.

I may or may not examine the strange ending of Chaos in this next book. But it will be dealt with soon enough. I should mention I’m toying with the idea of writing two other books first, both which fit firmly into the adventure genre. The first is an epic multi-book story about a post-apocalyptic treasure hunt. It has a bit of a science fiction element to it but it’s firmly set in the world as we know it. The second book is a kid’s novel that deals with dark parts of history and science that might hold particular interest for regular visitors to this site…namely, the paranormal. Like the first book, this one will deal with science fiction elements but in a very realistic manner.

Incidentally, a few weeks ago, I considering writing a half dozen short stories between Chaos and the sequel. Each short story would be a separate entity in its own right but would serve to connect the events of Chaos with those in the coming sequel. If that’s something you’d find interesting, let me know.

The End of Chaos…for Now!

Well, there you have it. Our journey has come to an end. But the real journey is just beginning. There are lots of lost treasures, unsolved mysteries, and strange cryptids to discuss. And of course, the sequel…as well as many other books! Thanks for reading along. I hope to see you back here tomorrow!

 

Chaos Book Club

The Strange Science of Superconductors?

On April 8, 1911, Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes was analyzing the impact of low temperatures on solid metals. While examining pure mercury, he used liquid helium to lower the temperature to 4.2 kelvin. Suddenly, the mercury wire changed into a superconductor…and forever altered the face of science.

The Chaos Book Club

Today is Day 20 of the Chaos book club. Chaos is an adventure thriller along the lines of Indiana Jones or books written by Clive Cussler, James Rollins, Douglas Preston, or Steve Berry. Thanks to those of you who’ve bought the novel already. If you haven’t already done so, please consider picking up a copy at one of the following locations:

Kindle * Nook * Kobo * iBooks * Smashwords * Paperback

The Discovery of Superconductors

So what happened to Onnes’ mercury wire? Well, at 4.2 kelvin, its electrical resistance vanished.

“Mercury has passed into a new state, which on account of its extraordinary electrical properties may be called the superconductive state.” ~ Heike Kamerlingh Onnes

And thus, the strange science of superconductors was born. A superconductor is a substance that shows zero electrical resistance at very low temperatures. This occurs because the low temperature causes atoms to cease random vibrations. Thus, electrons can flow freely from one atom to another with no resistance. This allows an electrical current to flow continuously through the superconductor with no power source.

Superconductors and the Meissner Effect

In 1933, Walter Meissner and Robert Ochsenfeld discovered that superconductors also exhibit something that has come to be known as the Meissner Effect. When the right substance is cryogenically cooled, it expels its internal magnetic field. This allows it to perfectly repel a magnetic field aimed in its direction. This turns the superconductor into “a mirror image of the magnet.” In practice, the Meissner Effect allows a superconductor to float endlessly above a powerful magnet.

Superconductors & Chaos

Suffice it to say that superconductors remain a source of great interest and mystery for physicists. They are expected to provide future opportunities in electric power transmission, transformers, power storage, and even magnetic levitation devices.

(SPOILER ALERT)

Superconductors are a fascinating field of research. As those of you who’ve read the novel know by now, they also inspired me in my creation of die Glocke, or the Nazi Bell. Hmmm…I wasn’t going to give this away but…well…okay. If you haven’t read Chaos yet, don’t read this next part! I don’t want to spoil it for you.

I knew Beverly was behind me, but I could no longer feel her presence. The blanket dominated my attention. While unremarkable on its own, it carried heavy symbolism for me.

It was the last remaining barrier between the Bell and me.

I walked over to it. As I grasped its coarse edge, I wondered what secrets I’d find on the other side. Would the Bell look the same as I’d imagined it? Could we destroy it?

I pulled the blanket out of the way. My beam lifted, casting into the space.

I froze.

The flashlight fell from my fingertips. It bounced on the floor and rolled. I felt a sudden reverence as if I stood before the Almighty Himself.

“Oh my God,” Beverly whispered. “Is it…?”

“It’s not touching the ground,” I replied dumbly. “The damn thing’s floating. It’s floating in mid-air.” ~ David Meyer, Chaos

Chaos by David Meyer

You can probably guess what keeps the mysterious Bell floating in mid-air. But Cy Reed’s journey is just beginning. He has to figure out a way to destroy the Bell. The fate of the world depends on it. You can read more about his thrilling adventure by getting a copy of Chaos at one of the links above.

That’s it for today. Tomorrow is the last day of the Chaos book club. For those of you who’ve stuck with me for this long, I’ve got a little treat for you. We’re going to take a look down the road at the coming sequel to Chaos. Stop by tomorrow to check it out…you won’t regret it!

 

Chaos Book Club